SF MoMa Raw Materials: Six Degrees

Is it really possible to reach anyone in the world through only six degrees of separation? In season six of Raw Material, audio producer Sayre Quevedo sets out to reach a stranger eight thousand miles away through a series of artists and friends, all of whom share their stories of love, trauma, distance, and togetherness along the way. 

In Episode 1, Jazmin convinces Sayre to break into his ex-boyfriend’s apartment with the goal of retrieving twenty-two love letters.

 

In Episode 2, Jazmin attempts to clear her conscience (and voice-mail box), by making a series of anxiety-inducing phone calls she'd been putting off with friends, family, and accusatory ex-lovers.

Chroma Conference Series: Strategies for Self-Actualization

This episode is an introduction into the concept of self-actualization from the perspectives of Jazmin Jones and Lumi Tan. We hear their thoughts on the notion of self actualizing their goals, how they’ve navigated their personal potentials and how they’ve managed to individually redefine what success and or achievement means to them.

Bitchface: Whose Imagination are You Living in?

Whose imagination are we living in normally? What are we subtly taught to fear? To worship? In our utopic visions art and queers and femmes have power. Our utopia is creative and collaborative and fun.

On the sun porch, we listened to BUFU — our interviews with Kat, Jazmin, Tsige, and Sonia last summer — and heard more signs of utopic scheming & also signs of emergence, the theory of political organizing popularized by the writer and activist adrienne maree brown. Actually, it was BUFU who first told us about Emergent Strategy, when we were just starting to make our own forays into collective organizing and programming.

 

adrienne says imagination is a battle. So whose imagination are you living in? 

 

And whose will win? 

Black Is Viral: What You Missed At Afrofuturism 2016

The Afrofuturism conference—April 29-May 1—at the New School in New York City, explored the virality of blackness with a cutting-edge mix of artists, and scholars exploring how Afrofuturism relates to the liberation of black people and people of color.

Filmmakers, Yeelen Cohen and Jazmin Jones who co-curated the Afrofuturism film festival and the video installation, “By Any Memes Necessary,” question what it means to be black and viral in the digital age. Their video installation which consisted of viral short videos made “by black people for black people” was an attempt to make the conference more accessible, and by bringing such viral videos out of context, into a public space; they argue, is a new way to create community.